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Dedication and Planting

In May 2005, Holocaust survivors and others of Jewish ancestry planted a dwarf oak in each of the three hollowed stones of Andy Goldsworthy’s “Garden of Stones” exhibit at Cornell Plantations. A crowd of friends, family, students and Cornell community members looked on and listened to remembrances.

At the dedication ceremony, Holocaust survivor and Cornell alumnus Peter Komor ’61 spoke about his survival at a Nazi concentration camp, as he described the day the camp was liberated. He and his granddaughter, Isha Komor Tohill ’08, planted the first tree in one of the boulders. In a separate boulder, Fred Voss, who also survived the Holocaust, and his wife, Ilse, planted another sapling. In the third hollowed boulder, Shiri Sandler ’05, co-leader of Students for Tolerance, Awareness and Remembering Survivors of the Holocaust and Genocides (STARS) and Cornell alumnus Dana Diament planted the third small oak.

“My working of the stones is a continuation of the journey these stones have made so far,” wrote sculptor Goldsworthy in a statement read at the dedication. “They have a history of movement, struggle and change--appropriate associations, I hope, for a Holocaust memorial garden.”

“While I don’t want to put words into Andrew Goldsworthy’s mouth, I think this piece is about the adversity of life against unyielding forces,” said Thomas Whitlow, Cornell associate professor of horticulture.

 
At the dedication of the Garden of Stones exhibit at Plantations in May 2005, Holocaust survivor Peter Komor ’61 and his granddaughter, Isha Komor Tohill ’08, planted the first tree in one of the boulders.