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Family Fun at Judy's Day! September 21 RAIN OR SHINE!

Published: 
11 weeks 2 days ago
Kids of all ages are invited to GO BANANAS exploring the fun and fascinating world of fruits at our Judy's Day Family Festival on Sunday, September 21 from 1 to 5 p.m. Rain or shine - we have tents! Whether tasting fruit, making fruit crafts or just enjoying a beautiful day in our F. R. Newman Arboretum, this event promises to be one you won’t want to miss! Learn more here.

Gorge safety program dedicated in memory of Nathaniel Rand

Published: 
12 weeks 2 days ago

In a tribute to Nathaniel Rand ’12, about 50 Cornell and local community members gathered at the Cornell Plantations’ Nevin Welcome Center August 26 to dedicate the Nathaniel Rand ’12 Memorial Gorge Safety Education Program.
Among them were Rand’s sister, Freya, and parents, Dr. Jacob Rand and Maggi Rand, who have been strong advocates for the gorge safety education program, created after Nathaniel died in a swimming accident in Fall Creek Gorge in 2011. The program promotes the safe enjoyment of the natural gorges that slice through campus, cascading in stunning but dangerous splendor to the flatlands below. Click here to read the full August 28 Cornell Chronicle article.

Booze and Botany Cocktail Party and Lecture September 17!

Published: 
12 weeks 2 days ago
Join author Amy Stewart in the Herb Garden for a pre-lecture cocktail party featuring drinks from her book, “The Drunken Botanist: The Plants that Create the World’s Great Drinks." The registration fee for this fundraiser include light hors d’oeuvres and tickets for three cocktail samples, provided by Agava restaurant. Proceeds support the mission of Cornell Plantations. Participants must be 21 or older and prepared to show proof of age. Pre-registration is required.

Date/time: September 17, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Cost: $50 ($45 members or Cornell students)
Location: Plantations' Botanical Garden

Click here to register.

Free lecture after the party
Join Amy Stewart for her lecture exploring the dizzying array of plants that humans have, through ingenuity, inspiration, and sheer desperation, contrived to transform into alcohol.

Date/Time: Wednesday, September 17, 7:30-8:30 p.m.
Location: Statler Hall Auditorium, Cornell University

Learn more here.

"Victis acernis" on display now

Published: 
12 weeks 2 days ago
"Victis acernis" is a sugar maple created in 2013 by Cornell University Professor Jack Elliot and Cornell students.

In Jack Elliot's words:

"Victis acernis" is latin for "vanquished maple." It is one of a series of pieces referencing the harmful effects of global warming. These pieces are positioned to resemble the checkmated king in chess. In this case, warmer winters are leading to less sap production and increased tree mortality. This body of work is entitled "arbortecture." These pieces are derived from large tree parts that have been harvested by Cornell University. These examples range in scale from small to large, from handheld to cranelifted. They are intended to challenge ideas about the human/nature relationship through juxtapositions of the geometric and the organic; the intentional and the spontaneous; the light and the dark. They often refer to a specific environmental issue, such as climate change or the decline of nature appreciation, but their primary purpose is to move the viewer though their scale, power, and intricacy.


FALL PLANT SALE - Sept 6

Published: 
13 weeks 3 days ago

Take home some of Plantations gardeners’ top picks for your own home landscape! This fall’s offerings will include small shrubs, a wide variety of perennials, and some new additions to the horticulture trade.  9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Location:Cornell Plantations Plant Production Facility, 397 Forest Home Dr. (The sale was originally scheduled for August 30.)

Poetry's evolutionary niche - SEPT 3!

Published: 
14 weeks 13 hours ago

Consider an orchid’s foot-long spur and a moth’s 12-inch tongue stretching through the spur to reach the orchid’s nectar. Poet Joanie Mackowski sees in this biological oddity the same co-evolutionary process that gives us poetry.  She’ll explore this process on Sept. 3 at 5:30 p.m. in Call Auditorium. Read more.

Joanie Mackowski
Mackowski

Consider an orchid’s foot-long spur and a moth’s 12-inch tongue stretching through the spur to reach the orchid’s nectar. Poet Joanie Mackowski sees in this biological oddity the same co-evolutionary process that gives us poetry.


She’ll explore this process for the Cornell Plantations’ William and Jane Torrence Harder Lecture Sept. 3 at 5:30 p.m. in Call Auditorium. The lecture, “You're the Bee's Kinesis: Poetry and Coevolution,” will include readings of poems by Mackowski and others and is open to the public.
Read the full article by Linda Glaser here.

Click here to see the 2014 Fall Lecture Series lineup.

What's been happening in the Climate Change Garden?

Published: 
14 weeks 6 days ago
In late spring, we installed a Climate Change demonstration garden to invite visitors to see for themselves how plants are affected by elevated temperatures. Intern Emily Rodekohr '15 tended to the garden and collected data throughout the summer. Find out what she observed in this two-minute video.

 

Climate Change Garden with Emily Rodekohr '15 from Cornell Plantations on Vimeo.

Some plants are out to get us

Published: 
15 weeks 14 hours ago

Plantations Natural Areas director Todd Bittner talks to the Ithaca Times about the threat of Giant Hogweed and other plants to know that can cause rashes or blisters. Read more in the August 9 article "Some plants are out to get us." 

Plantations featured in new book about Arboretums in America

Published: 
16 weeks 1 day ago
The F. R. Newman Arboretum at Cornell Plantations is among the 33 arboretums featured in Trees Live Here: the Arboretums of America, the first book to be devoted to these very special places. Written by a committed lover of trees, life-long Seattle resident Susan McDougall has traveled, mostly by train, with her camera, taken far too many photographs, and combined them with a readable and informative text.
 
“I’m passionate about trees. To share my love of these ‘places for trees’ through this book fulfills a real dream,” said McDougall.

Read the full article on Plantations Tumblr here.

Plantations bids a sad farewell to its beautiful Magnolia

Published: 
19 weeks 15 hours ago
Our big-leafed magnolia, sadly, has many serious structural and disease issues, which combined pose a significant risk of failure. And so it is with great regret that our treasured big-leafed magnolia will come down by the end of season.

By Christopher Dunn, Ph.D., the E. N. Wilds Director

Having recently joined Cornell Plantations, I am immediately amazed by the quality of the staff, gardens, natural areas, and the unique and often sacred plants in our collections. Many trees that grace our botanical garden and arboretum have been providing beauty and shade since the earliest days of Plantations. Among those is the beautiful Magnolia macrophylla, the big-leafed magnolia nestled between the Nevin Welcome Center and the Lewis Education Building in the heart of the botanical garden. In this location, it is far from its normal range of the Southeastern United States. This magnificent tree, estimated to be over 50 years old, has been a key feature of the botanical garden since 1966. It has aged and elicited countless cries of wonder as visitors pass under its canopy and admire its huge and beautiful flowers. It is, unfortunately, reaching the end of its life.  We have been tracking the health of this tree, noting various signs of decay and poor health, for many years. Our lead arborist recently said to me, “as with all living things, there comes a time when steps to preserve our trees and protect our visitors and staff are limited to only one option. This magnolia, sadly, has many serious structural and disease issues, which combined pose a significant risk of failure.”

And so it is with great regret that our treasured big-leafed magnolia will come down by the end of season. We invite you to say goodbye and marvel at its giant leaves and beautiful blooms one final time. Our horticulture staff has been growing a seedling of this tree, anticipating that this replacement will one day be needed. Once the seedling has been planted, we will have the pleasure of watching it grow and mature and enjoying another 50 years of splendor. Although we are sad, we take heart in this reminder from Aldo Leopold “There are two great acts, one is to harvest a tree because it involves faith that another will grow. The other is to plant a tree, because one must believe that it will grow.”

The video below features Lee Dean, Plantations' Lead Arborist, explaining his careful and thoughtful decision to remove this much beloved tree.

 

Saying Goodbye to an Old Friend... from Cornell Plantations on Vimeo.

 

To read Lee Dean's interview with the Ithaca Journal about this tree, click here.

 

Saying Goodbye to an Old Friend... from Cornell Plantations on Vimeo.