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FALL PLANT SALE - Sept 6

Published: 
4 days 21 hours ago

Take home some of Plantations gardeners’ top picks for your own home landscape! This fall’s offerings will include small shrubs, a wide variety of perennials, and some new additions to the horticulture trade.  9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. Location:Cornell Plantations Plant Production Facility, 397 Forest Home Dr. (The sale was originally scheduled for August 30.)

Poetry's evolutionary niche at Cornell Plantations

Published: 
1 week 1 day ago

Consider an orchid’s foot-long spur and a moth’s 12-inch tongue stretching through the spur to reach the orchid’s nectar. Poet Joanie Mackowski sees in this biological oddity the same co-evolutionary process that gives us poetry.  She’ll explore this process on Sept. 3 at 5:30 p.m. in Call Auditorium. Read more.

Joanie Mackowski
Mackowski

Consider an orchid’s foot-long spur and a moth’s 12-inch tongue stretching through the spur to reach the orchid’s nectar. Poet Joanie Mackowski sees in this biological oddity the same co-evolutionary process that gives us poetry.


She’ll explore this process for the Cornell Plantations’ William and Jane Torrence Harder Lecture Sept. 3 at 5:30 p.m. in Call Auditorium. The lecture, “You're the Bee's Kinesis: Poetry and Coevolution,” will include readings of poems by Mackowski and others and is open to the public.
Read the full article by Linda Glaser here.

Click here to see the 2014 Fall Lecture Series lineup.

What's been happening in the Climate Change Garden?

Published: 
2 weeks 19 hours ago

In late spring, we installed a Climate Change demonstration garden to invite visitors to see for themselves how plants are affected by elevated temperatures. Intern Emily Rodekohr '15 tended to the garden and collected data throughout the summer. Find out what she observed in this two-minute video.

Climate Change Garden with Emily Rodekohr '15 from Cornell Plantations on Vimeo.

Some plants are out to get us

Published: 
2 weeks 1 day ago

Plantations Natural Areas director Todd Bittner talks to the Ithaca Times about the threat of Giant Hogweed and other plants to know that can cause rashes or blisters. Read more in the August 9 article "Some plants are out to get us." 

Plantations featured in new book about Arboretums in America

Published: 
3 weeks 2 days ago

The F. R. Newman Arboretum at Cornell Plantations is among the 33 arboretums featured in Trees Live Here: the Arboretums of America, the first book to be devoted to these very special places. Written by a committed lover of trees, life-long Seattle resident Susan McDougall has traveled, mostly by train, with her camera, taken far too many photographs, and combined them with a readable and informative text.
 
“I’m passionate about trees. To share my love of these ‘places for trees’ through this book fulfills a real dream,” said McDougall.

Read the full article on Plantations Tumblr here.

Plantations bids a sad farewell to its beautiful Magnolia

Published: 
6 weeks 1 day ago

Our big-leafed magnolia, sadly, has many serious structural and disease
issues, which combined pose a significant risk of failure. And so it is
with great regret that our treasured big-leafed magnolia will come down
by the end of season.

By Christopher Dunn, Ph.D., the E. N. Wilds Director

Having recently joined Cornell Plantations, I am immediately amazed by the quality of the staff, gardens, natural areas, and the unique and often sacred plants in our collections. Many trees that grace our botanical garden and arboretum have been providing beauty and shade since the earliest days of Plantations. Among those is the beautiful Magnolia macrophylla, the big-leafed magnolia nestled between the Nevin Welcome Center and the Lewis Education Building in the heart of the botanical garden. In this location, it is far from its normal range of the Southeastern United States. This magnificent tree, estimated to be over 50 years old, has been a key feature of the botanical garden since 1966. It has aged and elicited countless cries of wonder as visitors pass under its canopy and admire its huge and beautiful flowers. It is, unfortunately, reaching the end of its life.  We have been tracking the health of this tree, noting various signs of decay and poor health, for many years. Our lead arborist recently said to me, “as with all living things, there comes a time when steps to preserve our trees and protect our visitors and staff are limited to only one option. This magnolia, sadly, has many serious structural and disease issues, which combined pose a significant risk of failure.”

And so it is with great regret that our treasured big-leafed magnolia will come down by the end of season. We invite you to say goodbye and marvel at its giant leaves and beautiful blooms one final time. Our horticulture staff has been growing a seedling of this tree, anticipating that this replacement will one day be needed. Once the seedling has been planted, we will have the pleasure of watching it grow and mature and enjoying another 50 years of splendor. Although we are sad, we take heart in this reminder from Aldo Leopold “There are two great acts, one is to harvest a tree because it involves faith that another will grow. The other is to plant a tree, because one must believe that it will grow.”

The video below features Lee Dean, Plantations' Lead Arborist, explaining his careful and thoughtful decision to remove this much beloved tree.

 

Saying Goodbye to an Old Friend... from Cornell Plantations on Vimeo.

 

To read Lee Dean's interview with the Ithaca Journal about this tree, click here.

 

Saying Goodbye to an Old Friend... from Cornell Plantations on Vimeo.

Haudenosaunee Dedication: A White Pine as a Tree of Peace

Published: 
7 weeks 18 hours ago

As part of our collaboration with Cornell’s American Indian Program, please join us this Saturday, July 12, in honoring the Haudenosaunee long-practiced peace-making tradition of planting a white pine at Cornell Plantations as an emblematic Tree of Peace in an effort to strengthen the message of peace and unity.

Date/time: Saturday, July 12; 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.
Location: Plantations Plant Production Facility, 397 Forest Home Drive, Ithaca

Program

Speaker: John Block (Seneca Allegany) will lead a traditional Haudenosaunee opening and closing and will give a short talk on "The Significance of the Haudenosaunee tradition of planting white pine as a tree of peace."

Interactive performance: The Allegany River Indian Dancers will lead participants in a Round Dance and Haudenosaunee song, music and dance.

Peace Offerings: There will be an opportunity for participants to offer messages of peace.

View this event on our calendar here.

 

Plantations seeks a Director of Horticulture and Arborist Assistant

Published: 
10 weeks 15 hours ago

Click here for job descriptions.

 

 

Our 2013 Annual Report now available online

Published: 
11 weeks 2 days ago

Click here to view our 2013 Annual Report online.

 

 

 

Help us make a difference

Published: 
11 weeks 3 days ago

Cornell Plantations’ gardens, arboretum, and natural areas are places for discovery and wonder.  But beyond our natural beauty and leadership in environmental conservation, education is at the heart of everything we do.

From Cornell students to local schoolchildren, visitors and lifelong learners, every year 14,000 people reconnect with nature through our tours, classes, and free public programs. This delightful short video shows the breadth and value of these programs and the
difference they make.

 

Cornell Plantations Spring Appeal from Cornell Plantations on Vimeo.

You can help people of all ages learn about plants and how essential they are to our lives and well-being. Please make a gift today.
Cornell University provides only 15% of our operating budget, so we rely on support from people like you who care about preserving the environment, and the importance of plants and nature in our lives.