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Celebrating the Winter Solstice in Cornell Plantations’ Mullestein Family Winter Garden

Published: 
37 weeks 4 days ago

Join Cornell Plantations on December 21 as we celebrate the Winter Solstice with our “Plants of the Winter Solstice” program, from 2:00 to 5:00 P.M., in the Mullestein Family Winter Garden and Brian C. Nevin Welcome Center.

By modern-day reckoning, the winter solstice marks the beginning of winter in the northern hemisphere, though in some earlier traditions the solstice was considered the middle of winter, or ‘midwinter’. Similarly, the summer solstice was once considered ‘midsummer’, as in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. This makes the Winter Garden the perfect spot to celebrate the first day of winter!

“The winter solstice has been celebrated around the world by many cultures since ancient times, and here in the West, a lot of our familiar holiday celebrations have ancient origins,” stated Kevin Moss, adult education and volunteer coordinator at Cornell Plantations. “Plants have always been a big part of those traditions. For example, evergreens were considered sacred by many ancient peoples because they were the plants that never died – they stayed green all winter long while other plants withered and died back when the life-giving sun was the furthest away.  Evergreen wreaths, with their circular shape, are symbols of strength and represent the cycle of life, death and rebirth.” 
Bringing evergreens indoors was believed to ward off misfortune through the winter season. A wonderful Celtic tradition held that bringing evergreens inside would give woodland spirits and faeries a warm place to spend the winter, and in return they would bring you good fortune. However, you had to make sure you didn’t leave the greens inside too long, or they might take up permanent residence -- and then you’d have a bunch of mischievous pixies living in your house!

Other plants such as oak, holly, ivy, and mistletoe have folk and mythic traditions related to the winter solstice as well.  The Oak was usually used for bonfires during the midwinter celebration known as Yule by pre-Christian Germanic peoples.  Celtic druids believe the oak to be the most sacred of all trees, and mistletoe that grew on oak trees was considered a powerful and sacred magical plant. Holly was included in the evergreens brought inside during the winter and was especially prized because of its shiny leaves and its ability to bear fruit in winter. Holly trees were sacred to the powerful Roman god Saturn, and holly wreaths with bright red berries were given as gifts during his holiday -- the Saturnalia, which was the winter solstice festival upon which the Christmas holiday was modeled.

You will discover the cultural and natural history of these plants and more at our “Plants of the Winter Solstice” program.  The program will include a guided tour of the Mullestein Winter Garden, and participants will make a simple evergreen wreath to take home. Then, as darkness descends, we’ll head back outside for some traditional wassailing and a simple solstice ceremony at our outdoor fire pit. Refreshments and all materials will be provided. The cost is $36 ($30 for Plantations members and Cornell students). Pre-registration is required. Click here to register.


About the Winter Solstice

The winter solstice itself is an astronomical event that occurs as a result of the earth’s 23.4 degree axial tilt, and its relationship to the sun. On the day of the solstice, the northern half of the planet is tilted directly away from the sun, so from the perspective of those living in the Northern Hemisphere, the sun rises and sets in its furthest point south of the equatorial plane, and traces its lowest arc across the daytime sky. This also gives us both the shortest day of the year, and the longest night. From that point on, however, the days will gradually grow longer and longer, and the nights shorter and shorter, as the sun slowly returns to the north.
But everything is relative to your position on the Earth: on the same date, December 21, if you’re in the southern hemisphere, you’ll celebrate the first day of summer. Winter for you would begin around June 21 – which is the time of the summer solstice for us. The winter solstice occurs at 12:11 pm EST on December 21, 2013. 

About the Mullestein Family Garden

You can enjoy the Winter Garden at Cornell Plantations throughout the year. This one-acre site contains over 700 plants chosen for their interesting bark texture, bark color, unusual growth habits, winter fruit, cones, or evergreen foliage. These qualities provide color and interest during Ithaca’s long winters, making the winter garden a year-round destination for visitors. Plants found in the garden include shrubby dogwoods, willows, birches, hawthorns, and small conifers in different shades of blue, silver, green, and gold, which provide an attractive backdrop for the bright fruit and bark colors.

Reasons to celebrate at Cornell Plantations

Published: 
38 weeks 3 days ago

Sustainable Tompkins honors Cornell Plantations with four “Sign of Sustainability" Awards

Sustainable Tompkins recognized Plantations with four “Sign of Sustainability” awards which honor individuals and businesses with new initiatives related to sustainability. The four awards recognized Plantations for:

  • Our Environmental Education Program for Sustainability (PEEPS), an experiential learning program for local teen-aged youth and Cornell University students which aims to raise ecological awareness and understanding among participants and teach them skills that will allow them to cultivate an environmental ethic for future actions.
    • The Fischer Environmental Conservation Award received by our Natural Areas Program from the Town of Ithaca in May.  This award recognizes efforts to preserve important environmental resources in the Town.
    • Our hosting Peter Raven’s “Conserving Species in a Changing World” Class of 1945 Lecture as part of our public Fall Lecture Series
    • Our offering a self-guided Poetry Walk through the Mundy Wildflower Garden this spring where visitors could connect native plants to original poetry through an audio tour.

Plantations is thrilled to offer our community these signs of sustainability and look forward to offering many more!

Cornell Plantations receives a “Pride of Ownership” award from the Ithaca Rotary Club and City of Ithaca

Plantations also received the “Pride in Ownership” award by the Ithaca Rotary Club and the City of Ithaca. This award recognizes owners who have developed projects or taken care of their property in ways that enhance the appearance of neighborhoods and commercial areas. As part of the restoration of Cascadilla Gorge, Plantations commissioned local blacksmith artist, Durand Van Doren, to create a metal gate to close the gorge in winter. The gate beautifully captures the gorge’s natural elements decorated with metal oak leaves, waterfalls, and bedrock complete with fossils.

F. R. Newman Arboretum closed for winter

Published: 
39 weeks 3 hours ago

The F. R. Newman Arboretum is closed to vehicle traffic until further notice. Pedestrians are welcome to explore the arboretum every day from dawn to dusk. Parking is available at the Mundy Wildflower Garden parking lot off of Caldwell Road at the intersection with Forest Home Drive, which is directly across from the arboretum.

"Les Arbres" watercolors by Camille Doucet on display

Published: 
40 weeks 6 days ago

Now through the end of December, you can visit the Nevin Welcome Center to enjoy "Les Arbres."

"Les Arbres" is a collection of eight watercolor paintings by Ithaca artist and long-time Plantations instructor Camille Doucet. All paintings reflect Camille's love of trees and honor their generosity, from enriching the soil and producing oxygen to providing shade and adding beauty. The Nevin Welcome Center is open Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Greenhouse Manager Missy Bidwell receives staff excellence award

Published: 
41 weeks 5 days ago

On Monday, November 4, Missy Bidwell, Greenhouse Manager of Cornell Plantations was awarded the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) Research and Extension Award in recognition of her commitment to communication.  

"In her role managing the entire nursery facility, she needs to work successfully with a wide army of stake holders.  She coordinates a large core of volunteers, student workers, interns, and staff who use the greenhouse for both growing plants and teaching. Keeping the highly diverse types of plants from tropical to annuals, trees and herbaceous perennials healthy, and getting them moved into new spaces as they grow requires a high level of organizational skill. Missy is superb at bringing order to this moving target." -Mary Hirshfeld, Director of Horticulture at Cornell Plantations.

The CALS Research and Extension awards recognize a broad range of accomplishments contributing to the realization of their vision, “To be the preeminent college for research, teaching and extension of agriculture and life sciences, developing leaders to address the global challenges of the 21st century.”

New members receive a subcription to "Better Homes and Gardens"

Published: 
42 weeks 4 days ago

Bonus for you! Included with your membership or membership renewal is a one-year subscription to Better Homes and Gardens--your choice of print or digital edition. Click here to learn more.

Read "Verdant Views" online

Published: 
44 weeks 5 days ago

The Summer/Fall issue of Cornell Plantations magazine, Verdant Views, is available to view online. Click here to read this issue and past issues.

Jim Sterba, author of "Nature Wars" will speak Wednesday October 23 at 7:30 p.m.

Published: 
45 weeks 6 days ago

Jim Sterba, author of "NATURE WARS" will be speaking at Cornell University on Wednesday, October 23, at 7:30 P.M. in the Statler Hall Auditorium as part of Cornell Plantations Fall Lecture Series.

If you are among the more than four thousand drivers who will hit a deer today, or your kids’ soccer field is an unplayable mess of goose droppings, or a coyote has snatched your cat, or beavers have flooded your backyard, or wild turkeys have attacked your mailman, or bears have looted your bird feeders, you might be wondering why. As award-winning journalist and reporter Jim Sterba explains, “It is very likely that more people live in closer proximity to more wild animals and birds in the eastern United States today than anywhere on the planet at any time in history.” The trouble, Sterba tells us, in "NATURE WARS: The Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards into Battlegrounds" (Crown; November 13, 2012), is that modern Americans have become so estranged from nature that many of them don’t know how to cope with the wild bounty in their midst. So they battle one another over what, if anything, to do as conflicts between wildlife and people mount.

Four hundred years of colonial expansion culminated in an “era of extermination” in the late 1800s—a crescendo of forest and wildlife destruction so egregious that it spawned a backlash, the conservation movement, and an incredible turnaround. As trees took back farm land, conservationists nurtured numerous wild populations back to health. All the while, Americans were moving out of urban settings into new suburbs and beyond. By 2000, more than half the population lived neither in cities nor on farms but in a vast tree-filled in-between that demographers call sprawl. Today, as Sterba shows in "NATURE WARS", more people live in forested sprawl than anywhere else, and they coexist—not always blissfully—with growing populations of wild animals and birds. But unlike their farming forebears, modern Americans typically get their nature indirectly, from film and television shows in which wild creatures often act like humans worthy of protection even as their populations grow, causing billions in damage, degrading ecosystems, and polarizing communities.

"NATURE WARS" offers an eye-opening look at Americans’ interactions with nature and animals, illustrating how we’ve failed to be responsible stewards despite our best efforts and intentions. A deeply researched, eloquently written, counterintuitive, and often humorous look at relations between humans and nature—and the deepening chasm between the two—"NATURE WARS" will be the definitive book on how we created this unintended, sometimes disastrous, mess.

Jim Sterba will also participate in a public Deer Management Panel Discussion sponsored by Cornell Plantations and Cornell's Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future to begin a dialogue about coordinated deer management within Tompkins County. The panel will feature a moderated panel discussion with experts, including Mr. Sterba, on Thursday, October 24 at 7:00 p.m. in the Ithaca High School cafeteria; the panel discussion is free and open to the public.

About the Author
Jim Sterba has been a foreign correspondent, war correspondent, and national affairs reporter for more than four decades, first for the New York Times and then for the Wall Street Journal. He lives in New York City with his wife, the author Frances FitzGerald.

Cornell Gorge Safety plan sees positive results

Published: 
46 weeks 4 days ago

In 2011, Cornell's Gorge Safety Committee created an on-going plan to increase the awareness of potential gorge dangers along with measures to make them safer. These efforts look to have been successful. Read more in the October 8 Cornell Daily Sun article "Cornell Sees Decrease in Gorge-Related Deaths."

Leading environmental advocate Peter Raven speaking about conserving species

Published: 
48 weeks 6 days ago

Internationally renowned botanist and leading environmental advocate Dr. Peter H. Raven, will speak about “Conserving Species in a Changing World,” as part of the Cornell Plantations Fall Lecture Series on September 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the Alice Statler Hall Auditorium.

Described by TIME magazine as a “hero for the planet”, Dr. Peter Raven, President Emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden, will explore how the living world that supports us along with all other living organisms is at serious risk owing to a combination of human population growth, rising consumption rates, and the use of often inappropriate technology.

Dr. Raven’s lecture will address the fact that species are becoming extinct at an increasing rate because of habitat destruction, spread of invasive species, and global climate change.  Steps that must be taken to reach global sustainability and social justice are drastic. But Dr. Raven will suggest strategies that, if employed, will save the maximum number of species while achieving a world in which conditions will allow their survival and the perpetuation of Earth’s living systems.

Having received the U.S. National Medal of Science in 2000, Dr. Raven champions worldwide research to preserve endangered plants.  He also served as a member of President Bill Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology and as a member of the National Academy of Sciences.  Among the numerous awards Dr. Raven has received are the prestigious International Prize for Biology from Japan, the U.S. National Medal of Science, and the International Cosmos Prize.  He has held Guggenheim and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation fellowships.
The author of numerous books and reports, both popular and scientific, Raven co-wrote Biology of Plants, an internationally best-selling textbook, now in its sixth edition. He also co-authored Environment, a leading textbook on the environment.

As part of Cornell Plantations Fall Lecture Series, this lecture is free and open to the public.  Parking can be found in the parking garage located on Hoy Road on the campus of Cornell University.

Click here for the complete lecture line-up.