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Nevin Welcome Center is closed Friday, January 31

Published: 
33 weeks 3 hours ago

We apologize for the inconvenience. The Welcome Center will reopen on Saturday, February 1st at 10 a.m. Throughout the month of February, all of our holiday-themed gift items will be 40% off. Click here for the Nevin Welcome Center hours.

Parking is now free for the first hour at the Botanical Garden!

Published: 
35 weeks 2 days ago

You've asked, we've listened, and now we are very excited to announce that parking at Plantations Nevin Welcome Center just got better!

Starting January 14, 2014, your first hour of parking is FREE!  Yes, you read that right – FREE!  You will still need to get a display ticket from the parking meter, but no payment is needed if you’re only staying for an hour. For longer visitis, the lot is metered during the weekday at a rate of $1.50 per hour from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. for a maximum of three hours. Visitors are not required to pay to park during evening hours and on weekends.

We hope that this new feature will encourage you to come out and take time to visit the Garden Gift Shop and the beautiful botanical garden.

Come see us soon!

Fall Lecture Series Videos now available!

Published: 
36 weeks 6 hours ago

Videos of our Fall Lectures are now available online.  Please note Jim Sterba’s “Nature Wars” lecture is only available for viewing January 9- 16.

In addition to viewing videos of our Fall Lectures, a recording of the Panel Discussion sponsored by Cornell Plantations and Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future about coordinated deer management within Tompkins County is available.

 

 

Click here for links to videos of all Fall Lectures.

Click here to view Jim Sterba's lecture and the Deer Management Panel Discussion he participated in.

"Winter Landscapes" on display at the Nevin Welcome Center

Published: 
36 weeks 2 days ago

Photographer Carl Schofield will be displaying images of winter scenes in the Finger Lakes area and other regions on gallery wrapped prints on canvas and satin media. This display will be in the Nevin Welcome Center lobby through the end of February.

The Nevin Center is Closed today due to weather

Published: 
37 weeks 8 hours ago

We apologize for the inconvenience. The welcome center will reopen tomorrow at 10 a.m.

Season's Greetings

Published: 
39 weeks 9 hours ago

Warm wishes this holiday season! Click here to view our holiday greeting.

 

Season's Greetings

Published: 
39 weeks 9 hours ago

Warm wishes this holiday season! Click here to view our holiday greeting.

 

 

 

 

Celebrating the Winter Solstice in Cornell Plantations’ Mullestein Family Winter Garden

Published: 
40 weeks 21 hours ago

Join Cornell Plantations on December 21 as we celebrate the Winter Solstice with our “Plants of the Winter Solstice” program, from 2:00 to 5:00 P.M., in the Mullestein Family Winter Garden and Brian C. Nevin Welcome Center.

By modern-day reckoning, the winter solstice marks the beginning of winter in the northern hemisphere, though in some earlier traditions the solstice was considered the middle of winter, or ‘midwinter’. Similarly, the summer solstice was once considered ‘midsummer’, as in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. This makes the Winter Garden the perfect spot to celebrate the first day of winter!

“The winter solstice has been celebrated around the world by many cultures since ancient times, and here in the West, a lot of our familiar holiday celebrations have ancient origins,” stated Kevin Moss, adult education and volunteer coordinator at Cornell Plantations. “Plants have always been a big part of those traditions. For example, evergreens were considered sacred by many ancient peoples because they were the plants that never died – they stayed green all winter long while other plants withered and died back when the life-giving sun was the furthest away.  Evergreen wreaths, with their circular shape, are symbols of strength and represent the cycle of life, death and rebirth.” 
Bringing evergreens indoors was believed to ward off misfortune through the winter season. A wonderful Celtic tradition held that bringing evergreens inside would give woodland spirits and faeries a warm place to spend the winter, and in return they would bring you good fortune. However, you had to make sure you didn’t leave the greens inside too long, or they might take up permanent residence -- and then you’d have a bunch of mischievous pixies living in your house!

Other plants such as oak, holly, ivy, and mistletoe have folk and mythic traditions related to the winter solstice as well.  The Oak was usually used for bonfires during the midwinter celebration known as Yule by pre-Christian Germanic peoples.  Celtic druids believe the oak to be the most sacred of all trees, and mistletoe that grew on oak trees was considered a powerful and sacred magical plant. Holly was included in the evergreens brought inside during the winter and was especially prized because of its shiny leaves and its ability to bear fruit in winter. Holly trees were sacred to the powerful Roman god Saturn, and holly wreaths with bright red berries were given as gifts during his holiday -- the Saturnalia, which was the winter solstice festival upon which the Christmas holiday was modeled.

You will discover the cultural and natural history of these plants and more at our “Plants of the Winter Solstice” program.  The program will include a guided tour of the Mullestein Winter Garden, and participants will make a simple evergreen wreath to take home. Then, as darkness descends, we’ll head back outside for some traditional wassailing and a simple solstice ceremony at our outdoor fire pit. Refreshments and all materials will be provided. The cost is $36 ($30 for Plantations members and Cornell students). Pre-registration is required. Click here to register.


About the Winter Solstice

The winter solstice itself is an astronomical event that occurs as a result of the earth’s 23.4 degree axial tilt, and its relationship to the sun. On the day of the solstice, the northern half of the planet is tilted directly away from the sun, so from the perspective of those living in the Northern Hemisphere, the sun rises and sets in its furthest point south of the equatorial plane, and traces its lowest arc across the daytime sky. This also gives us both the shortest day of the year, and the longest night. From that point on, however, the days will gradually grow longer and longer, and the nights shorter and shorter, as the sun slowly returns to the north.
But everything is relative to your position on the Earth: on the same date, December 21, if you’re in the southern hemisphere, you’ll celebrate the first day of summer. Winter for you would begin around June 21 – which is the time of the summer solstice for us. The winter solstice occurs at 12:11 pm EST on December 21, 2013. 

About the Mullestein Family Garden

You can enjoy the Winter Garden at Cornell Plantations throughout the year. This one-acre site contains over 700 plants chosen for their interesting bark texture, bark color, unusual growth habits, winter fruit, cones, or evergreen foliage. These qualities provide color and interest during Ithaca’s long winters, making the winter garden a year-round destination for visitors. Plants found in the garden include shrubby dogwoods, willows, birches, hawthorns, and small conifers in different shades of blue, silver, green, and gold, which provide an attractive backdrop for the bright fruit and bark colors.

Reasons to celebrate at Cornell Plantations

Published: 
40 weeks 6 days ago

Sustainable Tompkins honors Cornell Plantations with four “Sign of Sustainability" Awards

Sustainable Tompkins recognized Plantations with four “Sign of Sustainability” awards which honor individuals and businesses with new initiatives related to sustainability. The four awards recognized Plantations for:

  • Our Environmental Education Program for Sustainability (PEEPS), an experiential learning program for local teen-aged youth and Cornell University students which aims to raise ecological awareness and understanding among participants and teach them skills that will allow them to cultivate an environmental ethic for future actions.
    • The Fischer Environmental Conservation Award received by our Natural Areas Program from the Town of Ithaca in May.  This award recognizes efforts to preserve important environmental resources in the Town.
    • Our hosting Peter Raven’s “Conserving Species in a Changing World” Class of 1945 Lecture as part of our public Fall Lecture Series
    • Our offering a self-guided Poetry Walk through the Mundy Wildflower Garden this spring where visitors could connect native plants to original poetry through an audio tour.

Plantations is thrilled to offer our community these signs of sustainability and look forward to offering many more!

Cornell Plantations receives a “Pride of Ownership” award from the Ithaca Rotary Club and City of Ithaca

Plantations also received the “Pride in Ownership” award by the Ithaca Rotary Club and the City of Ithaca. This award recognizes owners who have developed projects or taken care of their property in ways that enhance the appearance of neighborhoods and commercial areas. As part of the restoration of Cascadilla Gorge, Plantations commissioned local blacksmith artist, Durand Van Doren, to create a metal gate to close the gorge in winter. The gate beautifully captures the gorge’s natural elements decorated with metal oak leaves, waterfalls, and bedrock complete with fossils.

F. R. Newman Arboretum closed for winter

Published: 
41 weeks 3 days ago

The F. R. Newman Arboretum is closed to vehicle traffic until further notice. Pedestrians are welcome to explore the arboretum every day from dawn to dusk. Parking is available at the Mundy Wildflower Garden parking lot off of Caldwell Road at the intersection with Forest Home Drive, which is directly across from the arboretum.